Monroe Library

Loyola University New Orleans

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Matt Shlian: Apophenia
Biever Guest LectureThursday, Feb. 6, 10 a.m.Multimedia Room 2, J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe LibraryFree admission
Opening ReceptionThursday, Feb. 6, 5 – 7 p.m.Collins C. Diboll Art GalleryFree admission
Matt Shlian, a paper engineer rooted in book arts, print media and design, will launch his new exhibit, Apophenia, at Loyola University New Orleans with a free, public lecture and opening reception. The Apophenia exhibit draws from Shlian’s series of the same name and refers to the artist’s perception of patterns or connections where none exists.
Through the lecture and exhibit, Shlian will explore how fine art and design inform one another, as well as how math and science relate to each other. Shlian allows his work to evolve on its own by beginning with an initial fold—a single action that then causes a transfer of energy to subsequent folds—that ultimately manifest in his drawings and three-dimensional forms.
Shlian also uses his engineering skills to create kinetic sculpture, collaborating with scientists at the University of Michigan. While researchers see paper engineering as a metaphor for scientific principles, he sees their inquiry as a basis for artistic inspiration, according to Shlian.
He has presented and conducted workshops across the country, and commissioners of his work include several prestigious organizations and entities, such as Apple, Ghostly International, IMTEK, The United States Mint, The University of Michigan and Queen Rania of Jordan, among many others.
The artist’s lecture is part of the Biever Grant Lecture Series.Both events are part of Loyola’s Montage Fine and Performing Arts Series.

Matt Shlian: Apophenia

Biever Guest Lecture
Thursday, Feb. 6, 10 a.m.
Multimedia Room 2, J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library
Free admission

Opening Reception
Thursday, Feb. 6, 5 – 7 p.m.
Collins C. Diboll Art Gallery
Free admission

Matt Shlian, a paper engineer rooted in book arts, print media and design, will launch his new exhibit, Apophenia, at Loyola University New Orleans with a free, public lecture and opening reception. The Apophenia exhibit draws from Shlian’s series of the same name and refers to the artist’s perception of patterns or connections where none exists.

Through the lecture and exhibit, Shlian will explore how fine art and design inform one another, as well as how math and science relate to each other. Shlian allows his work to evolve on its own by beginning with an initial fold—a single action that then causes a transfer of energy to subsequent folds—that ultimately manifest in his drawings and three-dimensional forms.

Shlian also uses his engineering skills to create kinetic sculpture, collaborating with scientists at the University of Michigan. While researchers see paper engineering as a metaphor for scientific principles, he sees their inquiry as a basis for artistic inspiration, according to Shlian.

He has presented and conducted workshops across the country, and commissioners of his work include several prestigious organizations and entities, such as Apple, Ghostly International, IMTEK, The United States Mint, The University of Michigan and Queen Rania of Jordan, among many others.

The artist’s lecture is part of the Biever Grant Lecture Series.
Both events are part of Loyola’s Montage Fine and Performing Arts Series.

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Today’s edition of #minibookmonday features The Poems of OssianThis tiny treasure, measuring 3 X 5 inches, was published in London in 1819.  It retains its original ornate binding, and features a fore-edge painting of horse-drawn carriage seen below. In its time, this was clearly a finely crafted book.

The Poems of Ossian themselves are less clear. Said to have been “translated” by James MacPherson (1736-1796) from ancient Gaelic texts and the oral tradition of the Scottish Highlands, doubts about the authenticity of poems began shortly after their “discovery” and publication. The charge against the veracity of the poems was largely led by Samuel Johnson, and an official inquiry by the Scottish Highland Society in 1805 supported the notion that MacPherson himself was the author.  The controversy did not do much to dampen interest in the poems themselves, as evidenced by the production of the fine volume we feature today. Indeed, the controversy may have made the poems more popular. (Napoleon was said to be a fan of The Poems of Ossian, and to carry copies with him into battle.) Whatever the ethics of Macpherson’s writings, The Poems of Ossian were  without a doubt widely read and influential on the Romantic period of the 19th century.

http://library.loyno.edu/blog/?p=3312

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Library Lagniappe: Mardi Gras Literature

As Carnival season heats up and the parades start to roll, it might be fun to delve into the history of Mardi Gras, not just from our current perspective, but from that of years past as well. In the Special Collections & Archives department of the Monroe Library we have Mardi Gras literature from as far back as 1887!

http://library.loyno.edu/blog/?p=3298

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Library Lagniappe: Interview with Lee Harvey Oswald
The Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives has recently opened a new exhibit titled, Collection Curiosities. This exhibit features rare and unusual items within our collection. One of those items is a recording on vinyl of an interview with Lee Harvey Oswald titled, Self-Portrait in Red.
On August 21, 1963, just three months before he assassinated President John F. Kennedy, Lee Harvey Oswald was interviewed by WDSU Radio in New Orleans. Bill Slatter spoke with Oswald on the radio station’s show, Conversation Carte Blanche, about his thoughts on the political situation with Cuba. At the time, Oswald was the secretary for the New Orleans chapter of the Fair Play for Cuba Committee, known as the principle voice for Fidel Castro in the United States. The recording features the only recorded statement in existence of Oswald’s opinion about President Kennedy.
If the cover art isn’t creepy enough, listen to the actual recording here: Side 1/Side 2.

Library Lagniappe: Interview with Lee Harvey Oswald

The Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives has recently opened a new exhibit titled, Collection Curiosities. This exhibit features rare and unusual items within our collection. One of those items is a recording on vinyl of an interview with Lee Harvey Oswald titled, Self-Portrait in Red.

On August 21, 1963, just three months before he assassinated President John F. Kennedy, Lee Harvey Oswald was interviewed by WDSU Radio in New Orleans. Bill Slatter spoke with Oswald on the radio station’s show, Conversation Carte Blanche, about his thoughts on the political situation with Cuba. At the time, Oswald was the secretary for the New Orleans chapter of the Fair Play for Cuba Committee, known as the principle voice for Fidel Castro in the United States. The recording features the only recorded statement in existence of Oswald’s opinion about President Kennedy.

If the cover art isn’t creepy enough, listen to the actual recording here: Side 1/Side 2.

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Special Collections and Archives presents “Collection Curiosities,” an exhibit of unusual and rarely seen items from Special Collections and Archives.
This exhibit is loosely inspired by Cabinet of Curiosities (also called Wunderkammer or Kunstkammer) which were early museums in Renaissance Europe showcasing collections of unusual and exotic items. The “cabinets” were actually rooms that showcased wonders of the natural world, art works, and items of unusual or unknown origin.
For over 100 years, Loyola University has been collecting books, personal papers, and original materials related to the Society of Jesus, Loyola University New Orleans, the city of New Orleans, and specific fields in which Loyola faculty and alumni have excelled or in which Jesuit values have found expression. While some of the items found in this exhibit fall into these categories, many were preserved simply due to their rare and unique characteristics. Occasionally, even the provenance, or origin, of the item is unknown, making their presence in the collection even more remarkable. These unconventional objects will be on exhibit in the Monroe Library Special Collections & Archives until May 31.

Special Collections and Archives presents “Collection Curiosities,” an exhibit of unusual and rarely seen items from Special Collections and Archives.

This exhibit is loosely inspired by Cabinet of Curiosities (also called Wunderkammer or Kunstkammer) which were early museums in Renaissance Europe showcasing collections of unusual and exotic items. The “cabinets” were actually rooms that showcased wonders of the natural world, art works, and items of unusual or unknown origin.

For over 100 years, Loyola University has been collecting books, personal papers, and original materials related to the Society of Jesus, Loyola University New Orleans, the city of New Orleans, and specific fields in which Loyola faculty and alumni have excelled or in which Jesuit values have found expression. While some of the items found in this exhibit fall into these categories, many were preserved simply due to their rare and unique characteristics. Occasionally, even the provenance, or origin, of the item is unknown, making their presence in the collection even more remarkable. These unconventional objects will be on exhibit in the Monroe Library Special Collections & Archives until May 31.

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Library Lagniappe: New NOLA Collection
Special Collections & Archives has a new collection available of assorted New Orleans memorabilia. Usually archival and manuscript collections were assembled by a person, persons, or organization because the materials in the collection have research value when kept together. Sometimes, however, we wind up with an “artificial collection,” or one that didn’t grow out of a particular function but instead has been put together to make items easier to use.
The Collection of New Orleans Miscellany is such a collection as it is comprised of various individual documents, photographs, and other ephemera relating to the history of New Orleans. We’ll be unveiling some of the other items in the collection soon, but for now, we present an invite to the Mirth, Melody & Moonlight ball.

Library Lagniappe: New NOLA Collection

Special Collections & Archives has a new collection available of assorted New Orleans memorabilia. Usually archival and manuscript collections were assembled by a person, persons, or organization because the materials in the collection have research value when kept together. Sometimes, however, we wind up with an “artificial collection,” or one that didn’t grow out of a particular function but instead has been put together to make items easier to use.

The Collection of New Orleans Miscellany is such a collection as it is comprised of various individual documents, photographs, and other ephemera relating to the history of New Orleans. We’ll be unveiling some of the other items in the collection soon, but for now, we present an invite to the Mirth, Melody & Moonlight ball.

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Library Lagniappe: It’s Carnival Season! 
With the arrival of Twelfth Night on January 6th, carnival season has officially begun. In New Orleans this means that carnival balls, parties and parades will occur until the season culminates on Mardi Gras, which this year falls on Tuesday, March 4th. Special Collections and Archives has many materials relating to the celebration of carnival in New Orleans. Today’s edition of “Found in the Archives” focuses on some of the carnival ball invitations found in our New Orleans Carnival Collection.

Library Lagniappe: It’s Carnival Season! 

With the arrival of Twelfth Night on January 6th, carnival season has officially begun. In New Orleans this means that carnival balls, parties and parades will occur until the season culminates on Mardi Gras, which this year falls on Tuesday, March 4th. Special Collections and Archives has many materials relating to the celebration of carnival in New Orleans. Today’s edition of “Found in the Archives” focuses on some of the carnival ball invitations found in our New Orleans Carnival Collection.

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Today’s edition of #minibookMonday features another tiny publication from Alembic Press titled, “A Summer Garden.” Illustrated by Muriel Mallows, this book was constructed with an accordion style – folded to open out along four different directions as one walks down the garden path. The opened book builds up to a large linocut of a poppy on the reverse. http://library.loyno.edu/blog/?p=3241

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Friend of the Month: Enara Iturrioz
The Monroe Library Friend of the Month for November is Enara Iturrioz!  Enara is an exchange student from San Sebastián in Basque Spain who is studying Law and Business Administration.  Enara spent the semester at Loyola as part of an exchange program through ICADE (Instituto Católico de Administración y Dirección de Empresas) Madrid. She has one more semester left at ICADE, and after graduation, Enara plans on either continuing her studies in the United States or finding a job in Europe.
Enara uses the library to study and to do research.  She utilizes many of the Monroe Library’s resources including computers, laptops, study rooms, and DVD checkouts.  She especially likes the different qualities of the library’s three floors: Enara uses the first floor for group work, does homework on the second floor, and studied for finals on the third floor.
Enara thinks that the Monroe Library can help further student success by making it easier to renew laptops.  She said, “To renew, you have to come to the front desk.  Another way to renew would be good.”
Enara said that she loves the Monroe Library because everyone is kind and helpful.  “It makes me feel like home.  Knowing that you are in a caring environment makes me feel satisfied!” said Enara.
Thank you for using the Monroe Library, Enara, and congratulations on being our Friend of the Month!

Friend of the Month: Enara Iturrioz

The Monroe Library Friend of the Month for November is Enara Iturrioz!  Enara is an exchange student from San Sebastián in Basque Spain who is studying Law and Business Administration.  Enara spent the semester at Loyola as part of an exchange program through ICADE (Instituto Católico de Administración y Dirección de Empresas) Madrid. She has one more semester left at ICADE, and after graduation, Enara plans on either continuing her studies in the United States or finding a job in Europe.

Enara uses the library to study and to do research.  She utilizes many of the Monroe Library’s resources including computers, laptops, study rooms, and DVD checkouts.  She especially likes the different qualities of the library’s three floors: Enara uses the first floor for group work, does homework on the second floor, and studied for finals on the third floor.

Enara thinks that the Monroe Library can help further student success by making it easier to renew laptops.  She said, “To renew, you have to come to the front desk.  Another way to renew would be good.”

Enara said that she loves the Monroe Library because everyone is kind and helpful.  “It makes me feel like home.  Knowing that you are in a caring environment makes me feel satisfied!” said Enara.

Thank you for using the Monroe Library, Enara, and congratulations on being our Friend of the Month!

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